Archive for October, 2010

October 1st 2010

Wrapping up September

Here’s what I finished reading in the last two weeks of the month.  As always, I’ve got several piled around that I’m half or a third or nine-tenths finished reading.

Born in Death by J. D. Robb: one of the earlier ones I’d missed.  Eve Dallas always catches the bad guys, while exchanging amusing banter with her team and having steamy sex with her husband, who is filthy rich.

Salvation in Death by J. D. Robb: I swear I read this one before, I just can’t find it in any of my lists.  Bad guys kill a bunch of people, one of them winds up dead and Dallas sends the other off-planet for the rest of whatever.  Snark, humor, sex and good police work build another good story!

Mastering Composition by Ian Roberts:  creating art by just getting my emotions out on the page has worked fairly well for me for years.  But lately I’ve been thinking I might create different art if I paid attention to all the rules one learns in art school.  This is not the book to learn from, though.  It really made me feel stupid.  In all of the “notice how this part of the painting grabs your attention” I got really pissed off because that wasn’t the part of the painting that grabbed my interest.  Maybe this book is meant for someone who paints representational art rather than non-representational art.  I’m glad I borrowed this one from the library rather than buying, because I’m one dissatisfied customer here.

Simply Vegan by Debra Wasserman

Vegan Express by Nava Atlas: I found a total of four recipes from these two cookbooks that I thought I might try.  I probably won’t try them any time soon, as all the recipes involve using either the stove or the oven, and I’m really not in the mood to cook.  Maybe next month.

When Darkness Falls by James Grippano: There are now (apparently) eight Jack Swytek novels by Grippano.  I’ve read four of them… completely out of order.  That sort of thing usually makes me crazy, but Grippano writes his stories tightly and while there are certainly references to previous books, you don’t need to know what went on back then to enjoy the current novel.  And the Jack Swytek series is definitely enjoyable!

Eat, Drink & Be Vegan by Dreena Burton:  Honestly, I don’t know why I keep reading cookbooks.  Yes, the pictures of completed dishes look great… but I hate to cook.  I did find another recipe for Green Split Pea Soup that looks pretty good.  I collect recipes for split pea soup.  I just love it.

Eye of the Beholder by David Ellis: Oh, boy… this one is confusing because it bounces back and forth between 1989 and 2005.  And it’s pretty twisty.  I didn’t see that ending coming.  Well, a couple of things… but not the most important one.  Definitely read this one!

Cop Without a Badge by Charles Kipps:  A true-life story of a confidential informant.  It’s not something I would have found to read if The Offspring had not requested that I pick it up for her at the library.  It was worth the read.

The Simple Secret to Better Painting by Greg Albert: Ah, now this one was much more helpful.  The simple secret isn’t all that profound (don’t make any two intervals the same), but the explanation of the “secret” utilizing all the various aspects of a painting was helpful.  And since the author tended to take everything to a very simple abstract level (black and white or greyscale blobby images), it was really much more useful to me as an abstract painter.  I’ve put this one in my Amazon wish list.

BoneMan’s Daughters by Ted Dekker: Oh, very creepy.  And twisty.  If you like creep and twisty, this is one you should read.  On the other hand, if you like rainbows and sunshine, pick something else.

Suite 606 by J. D. Robb: This is a collection of four different novellas.  I only picked it up so I could read J. D. Robb’s Ritual in Death, which was every bit as good as the rest of her stories.  I started reading the others… but lost interest.

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